Interstitial Cystitis | Nore Women's Health

TREATMENT FOR INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS (PAINFUL BLADDER SYNDROME)

YOU ALREADY KNOW...

Bladder related pain can significantly impact your life. This pain may result in emotional distress, depression, painful intercourse and interference in relationships and work.

YOU MAY NOT KNOW...

Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC / PBS) describes pain related to the bladder and/ or urethra. It is estimated to affect over one million American women. The exact cause of this condition is not fully understood.

Many times, women are misdiagnosed as having recurrent bladder infections or “UTls” and most have been treated repeatedly with antibiotics, even when urine tests have confirmed that no bacterial infection exists. It may take years to get an accurate diagnosis for IC/ PBS, and this condition is commonly associated with other painful conditions including painful intercourse, vulvodynia and vaginal pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia and other auto-immune diseases, which also may require further diagnosis and therapy.

YOU NEED TO KNOW...

IC/ PBS and its associated conditions can be treated through a variety of options. In time, most women have considerable relief with proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

Evaluation and Testing

EXAM. To arrive at the proper diagnosis, your provider will get a detailed medical and surgical history and conduct a physical exam, including a gentle pelvic examination. Additionally, questionnaires and a bladder diary can be helpful in establishing the diagnosis as well as the severity.

URINALYSIS AND CULTURE. A urine specimen will be examined for abnormalities including infection and blood.

Treatment Options

DIETARY AND BEHAVIOR CHANGES. Many common foods and beverages (caffeine, soda, citrus, spicy foods are some examples) can have a negative impact on the bladder in patients with IC/ PBS. Modifications in diet, through attempts to identify and eliminate triggers, can be very helpful in preventing bladder pain or flares. Learn more by visiting the Interstitial Cystitis Association.

MEDICATIONS. Medications to treat nerve pain, decrease inflammation, improve mood and help seal the bladder lining ore often employed. It is common to use more than one medication in combination and your regimen will be determined based on your specific symptoms.

BLADDER INSTILLATIONS. A “cocktail” of various, soothing medications, including pain relievers and anti-inflammatories, are instilled directly into the bladder to provide immediate relief of painful bladder symptoms.

PHYSICAL THERAPY. In patients who have IC or other pelvic pain conditions, the pelvic floor muscles may be tight or in spasm, have a combination of tightness and weakness, or have pain-triggering spots or knots called “trigger points”. Many women use physical therapy to treat these problems and pelvic floor muscle PT can go a long way toward easing pain and improving bladder symptoms. Your provider works with pelvic floor physical therapists specially trained in the techniques that help women with IC/PBS and pelvic pain.